Lagos Photo Festival

Lagos Photo Festival is an annual photography festival held in Lagos, Nigeria.

In 2018, the festival’s theme was Time Has Gone. It featured work by the Ekopolitan Project’s founder Abosede George and received coverage by Vogue Italia. George created an audio piece which reworks the archives of a court case from the late 1800s in Lagos, Nigeria. Visitors would sit in an audio booth, like the one pictured at left, and listen to the trial and testimonies from the court case Ayebomi vs. Regina.

Recordings

Experience the audio for yourself.

Ajatu
<strong>Ajatu</strong> <br /><br /> Native of Owu, born c. 1825 <br /> Murdered in Lagos after 30 years of enslavement in Brazil, 1871. <br /> Languages: Yoruba, Brazilian Portuguese, unknown <br /> <br /> The testimony of Ajatu’s ghost is entirely a product of imagination inspired by the record of a true court case that occurred in Lagos from 1871–1888. The archival documents that let us know about the case were recorded by an anonymous clerk who wrote entirely in English, despite the fact that the parties to the case were unlikely to be English speakers. This project seeks to draw attention to the always present, yet often invisible, translators and recorders who created the colonial archive. <br /><br /> Sources: Justice Research Initiative and Lagos High Court Archives; Susan Rosenfeld, PhD for sharing her copies of the case file with Abosede George.
Shetolu
<strong>Shetolu Francisco Gomez</strong> <br /><br /> Native of Owu, born c. 1825<br /> Resident in Abeokuta after 30 years of enslavement in Brazil. 1888. <br /> Languages: Yoruba, Brazilian Portuguese, unknown <br /><br /> This testimony is based on a true court case that occurred in Lagos from 1871 - 1888. The archival documents that let us know about the case were recorded by an anonymous clerk who wrote entirely in English, despite the fact that the parties to the case were unlikely to be English speakers. This project seeks to draw attention to the always present, yet often invisible, translators and recorders who created the colonial archive. <br /><br /> Sources: Justice Research Initiative and Lagos High Court Archives; Susan Rosenfeld, PhD for sharing her copies of the case file with Abosede George.
Ayebomi
<strong>Ayebomi</strong> <br /><br /> Born c. 1835<br /> Native of Owu<br /> Resident in Abeokuta<br /> Languages: Yoruba, unknown<br /> <br /> This testimony is based on a true court case that occurred in Lagos from 1871–1888. The archival documents that let us know about the case were recorded by an anonymous clerk who wrote entirely in English, despite the fact that the parties to the case were unlikely to be English speakers. This project seeks to draw attention to the always present, yet often invisible, translators and recorders who created the colonial archive. <br /><br /> Sources: Justice Research Initiative and Lagos High Court Archives; Susan Rosenfeld, PhD for sharing her copies of the case file with Abosede George.
George William Johnson
<strong>George William Johnson</strong> <br /><br /> Native of Sierra Leone<br /> Clerk in Southern Protectorate of Nigeria and Colony of Lagos for 10 years (c.1888).<br /> Languages: Krio, English, unknown<br /><br /> This testimony is based on a true court case that occurred in Lagos from 1871–1888. The archival documents that let us know about the case were recorded by an anonymous clerk who wrote entirely in English, despite the fact that the parties to the case were unlikely to be English speakers. This project seeks to draw attention to the always present, yet often invisible, translators and recorders who created the colonial archive.<br /><br /> Sources: Justice Research Initiative and Lagos High Court Archives; Susan Rosenfeld, PhD for sharing her copies of the case file with Abosede George.
Ayebomi vs. Regina Trial
<strong>Ayebomi vs. Regina</strong><br /><br /> Final Day in Court, 1888<br /> Languages: Yoruba, English (various dialects)<br /><br /> This testimony is based on a true court case that occurred in Lagos from 1871–1888. The archival documents that let us know about the case were recorded by an anonymous clerk who wrote entirely in English, despite the fact that the parties to the case were unlikely to be English speakers. This project seeks to draw attention to the always present, yet often invisible, translators and recorders who created the colonial archive.<br /><br /> Sources: Justice Research Initiative and Lagos High Court Archives; Susan Rosenfeld, PhD for sharing her copies of the case file with Abosede George.